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Feb
24
2012

James Bond movie ROI, raw numbers

Rounding out this week of discussion where we’re nailing down a true common denominator basis for assessing the financial performance of James Bond movies, I’m providing below a summary of return on investment (ROI) in chronological order.

Again, this is based on IMDb.com data. It follows the precept of Eon Productions icon Albert R Broccoli, who said the James Bond movies should be judged by budget dollars “on the screen.” In practical terms, such accountability means objective results from budget each dollar spent. Audiences can always find disagreement in where money is allocated, eg, actors’ salaries versus special effects. But there shouldn’t be any disagreement in comparing expenditures to resultant world wide gross, right?

For every dollar spent, here’s what each James Bond movie since 1962 has returned:

  • Dr No (1962) … $59.57
  • From Russia with Love (1963) … $39.45
  • Goldfinger (1964) … $41.63
  • Thunderball (1965) … $15.69
  • Casino Royale* (1967) … $3.48
  • You Only Live Twice (1967) … $11.75
  • On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969) … $10.25
  • Diamonds Are Forever (1971) … $16.11
  • Live and Let Die (1973) … $23.11
  • The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) … $13.94
  • The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) … $13.24
  • Moonraker (1979) … $6.78
  • For Your Eyes Only (1981) … $6.98
  • Octopussy (1983) … $6.82
  • Never Say Never Again* (1983) … $4.44
  • A View to a Kill (1985) … $5.09
  • The Living Daylights (1987) … $4.78
  • Licence to Kill (1989) … $3.72
  • GoldenEye (1995) … $5.94
  • Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) … $3.09
  • The World Is Not Enough (1999) … $2.68
  • Die Another Day (2002) … $3.04
  • Casino Royale (2006) … $5.85
  • Quantum of Solace (2008) … $2.51

*Note: The 1967 Casino Royale and 1983 Never Say Never Again were not Eon Productions movies.

One Response to “James Bond movie ROI, raw numbers”

  1. Bryan Says:

    How do these ROIs compare to industry average ROIs in the same years? Perhaps it’s the industry in decline rather than the franchise? (I actually have no idea, just speculating.)

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